Patricio Cumsille

Patricio Cumsille

Associate Researcher Researchers RESEARCH LINE: Group and Individual Interactions

Associate Researcher at Individual and Group Interactions Line at COES and Associate Professor at Psychology school of Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. Psychologist, Ph.D. in Human Development and Family Studies at Pennsylvania State University, M.S. in Family and Community Development at University Maryland. His research interests include the study of the relationships between parents and children as a context for development and the study of civic and prosocial development in young people.

Proyectos de investigación del autor

2017 In Process “Could “Machuca” be viable, today?: Personal, intergroup and social precedents of social cohesion in the classroom in the metropolitan region of Santiago” The main goal of this project is to study, within the Chilean context, the personal, intergroup and social factors that can explain social cohesion in a micro environment, such as the classroom. Specifically, the individual dimension (empathy, emotional regulation, beliefs and family values); the intergroup dimension (social identity, prejudices, stereotypes, social dominance); and the social dimension (socioeconomic status, territorial characteristics) will be considered as eventual predictive factors of social cohesion in the classroom.
Main ResearcherPaula Luengo
2014 Completed Latent class analysis of forms of civic and political participation among Chilean adolescents In order to identify different patterns of civic participation, this project analyzed patterns of civic and political participation among Chilean adolescents using a latent class analysis (LCA, see Methodology section). The identification of homogeneous groups that underlie the civic and political participation behavior of adolescents allowed for the identification of patterns of shared responses for groups of individuals as well as predictors of group membership. The identification of patterns of civic participation is particularly relevant in adolescence when these behaviors begin to develop.
Main ResearcherPatricio Cumsille