Interactive associations of parental support, demands, and psychological control, over adolescents’ beliefs about the legitimacy of parental authority

Interactive associations of parental support, demands, and psychological control, over adolescents’ beliefs about the legitimacy of parental authority

2018
 - Journal of Adolescence

The present study examined the relationship between parental support, demand, psychological control and adolescents' beliefs about the legitimacy of parental authority for personal and multifaceted issues in a sample of 1342 Chilean adolescents (M?=?16.38, SD?=?1.24, age range 14-20). Results from multiple regression analyses separated by age indicated that demand was positively associated with adolescents' beliefs about the legitimacy of parental authority for personal and multifaceted issues and that psychological control was negatively associated with adolescents' legitimacy beliefs concerning personal issues. Furthermore, parental support moderated the relationship between parental demand and adolescents' beliefs about parental legitimacy for personal and multifaceted issues: those who display high levels of demand showed stronger beliefs about parental legitimacy at high level of support. These results support the interactive effect of parental support and demand on adolescent development.

Adolescents differ in the degree to which they believe parents have the legitimate right to regulate their behavior (Kuhn & Laird, 2011). Interest on beliefs about the legitimacy of parental authority (BPL) as mostly centered on studying normative changes and determinants of this phenomenon. Some studies have connected beliefs about the legitimacy of parental authority with parenting style dimensions (e.g, Cumsille et al., 2006Cumsille et al., 2009). Parenting style is a set of attitudes towards children which creates an emotional climate within which parenting behaviors are expressed (Darling & Steinberg, 1993). Certain dimensions are key to its characterization, specifically support or attitudes perceived as supportive of psychosocial development, demand or expectations applied to children’s behaviors depending on the social/family norms, and psychological control as parental emotional manipulation that restrict the child’s autonomy (Barber, Maughan, & Olsen, 2005). Support is positively related (Darling, Cumsille, & Martínez, 2008) and psychological control is negatively related with beliefs about the legitimacy of parental authority (Kuhn & Laird, 2011).

(Disponible solo en inglés)

Como Citar

Mellado, C., Cumsille, P. & Martínez, M. L. (2018). Interactive associations of parental support, demands, and psychological control, over adolescents' beliefs about the legitimacy of parental authority. Journal of Adolescence 64: 81-88. Disponible con DOI: 10.1016/j.adolescence.2018.02.001