Urban Space Production and Social Exclusion in Greater Santiago, under Dictatorship and Democracy

Urban Space Production and Social Exclusion in Greater Santiago, under Dictatorship and Democracy

2016
Capítulo de libro  - Routledge EN: Urban voices in a neoliberal delirium.

Since the 1973 coup d’état, Chile has suffered a Deep process of social restructuration (Giddens 1984), which has been imposed by political and exclusionary forms of violence. This transformation has involved a transition from the fear of military forces to a social consent that beholds unregulated markets as the principal mechanism for private and public goods distribution (Mockenberg 2001; Atria et. Al 2013). Notably, a group of young economists with postgraduate studies at the Chicago School of economics, following Friedrich Hayek´s and Milton Friedman´s economic theories, exerted a decisive ideological influence over Pinochet´s regime. As the State was considered an inefficient agent, key public services and enterprise were privatized, while subsidies were allocated in order to promote the access of insolvent populations to housing, health and education markets. Ever since, the capacities of the public sector to regulate economic activities in order to promote social benefits over private interests have been continuously eroded, due to constitutional and legislative restrictions to the scope of public action, limited budgets and a strong influence of private experts and interests over the design of public policies, (Garreton 2013).

Como Citar

Garretón, M. (2016). Urban Space Production and Social Exclusion in Greater Santiago, under Dictatorship and Democracy. En Fabula Santiago (DPU of University College of London): urban voices in a neoliberal delirium. Routledge (fourthcoming).