Where are the Missing Babies: The Role of Higher Education Access on Family Planning

Where are the Missing Babies: The Role of Higher Education Access on Family Planning

2017
Revista Académica  - Economic Development and Cultural Change

(Disponible solo en inglés/ preliminar e incompleto:) In Chile, the total fertility rate has fallen from 2.66 births per woman in 1985 to 1.86 births per woman in 2010. We attribute this fall to changes in access to higher education, in particular, the LOCE law, which allowed the creation of 13 universities in 1990. We find that the greater access to higher education negatively affected fertility through a postponement of fertility, and no catch up 10 years later.

Since the 70’s, most developed countries have suffer a decline in their fertility rates, which worries policy makers because of its consequences in population aging and the shrinking labor force. This phenomenon is not exclusive to wealthy countries. In Chile, the total fertility rate has fallen from 2.66 births per woman in 1985 to 1.86 births per woman in 2010. This decrease has not been constant across cohorts. Between 1985 and 2010 the total number of births for women aged 20-24 fell from more than 80 thousands to less than 60 thousands. During the same time period, the number of births for women aged 30 or more increased (see Figure 1).

Como Citar

Paredes, V; Duarte, F & Troncoso, P. (2017) Where are the Missing Babies: The Role of Higher Education Access on Family Planning en: Economic Development and Cultural Change