World Culture, Uncoupling, Institutional Logics, and Recoupling: Practices and Self identification as Institutional Microfoundations of Political Violence

World Culture, Uncoupling, Institutional Logics, and Recoupling: Practices and Self identification as Institutional Microfoundations of Political Violence

2015
Revista Académica  - Sociological Forum

This study proposes a micro-institutional theory of political violence, according to which citizens' participation in political violence is partially an outcome of tight coupling of persons' practices and self-identifications with institutional logics opposed to dominant logics associated with world culture, such as the nation-state and gender equality.

The study focuses on two types of institutional carriers through which persons adopt institutional logics: routine practices and self-identifications associated with three institutional logics: the familial, the ethnic, and the religious logics. Using a 15-country survey data from early twenty-first-century sub-Saharan Africa, the study finds evidence in support of the theory.

Reported participation in political violence is associated with practices and self-identifications uncoupled from dominant world-culture logics but tightly coupled with the patriarchal familial logic, with an oppositional ethnic logic, and with a politicized oppositional religious logic.

Como Citar

(Online First)
Velitchkova, A. (2015). World Culture, Uncoupling, Institutional Logics, and Recoupling: Practices and Self-Identification as Institutional Microfoundations of Political Violence. Sociological Forum, 30: 698–720. doi:10.1111/socf.12188